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Your thoughts on successfully working from home

Your thoughts on successfully working from home

Posted: 17th March 2020

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
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  • #5481
    Anonymous

    Either this virus will help managers understand why working from home wasn’t something to be so ‘scared’ of; or it will prove them right. Nonetheless, it has to happen, and this is a real test of how good your managers are. It’s also a test of the HR department – how it navigates quite an emotive topic at a pretty emotive time.

    #5523
    Jo
    Participant

    I couldn’t agree more with your point about Managers (and leadership as well).  I’ve seen the wheat separated from the chaff very quickly (with some allowances for parents/carers who have suddenly found themselves with a juggling act they never anticipated) .  It’s been fascinating to observe, and I’m sure there will be lots more insight to come out of this experience for all of us.

    #5550
    Anonymous

    Hi all,

    Does anyone have some interesting/innovative ways of working with and supporting your team who are parents (of varying ages) during this time? Our current stance is to be as flexible as possible, and as long as you can ‘get done’ what needs to get done, we’re fine for you to figure it out with your manager – just make sure you discuss ways of working (timings etc) and how you’re going to communicate. However, I think if we’re in this situation for a long time, it’s not so sustainable for a long time, so I think we’re going to have to give clearer options/more direction. We’re currently collating lots of ideas, so would love to hear yours – and then happy to share everything we find!

    Natalie

    #5555
    Jo
    Participant

    We’ve allowed our parents and carers to request temporary reduced hours if they need to, or take unpaid parental leave (which helps them and reduces our salary bill simultaneously).  We’ve told everyone else that for the next few months, it’s all hands on deck and flexibility is essential from everyone, particularly from those who have less work to do right now and need to be redeployed.  To give you a simple example of that working in practice, we’ve got a business origination assistant preparing some ‘health and safety whilst working from home training’, with input from the right people of course, but he is doing the bulk of the work.  It’s a small business though, so easier to put this in place as the relationships between people are already there.

    #5611
    Anonymous

    Thanks Kate

    #5621
    DanCB
    Participant

    Yes this is going to be a tough one to deal with longer-term.  Helen in our team has school-aged kids and so she’s been able to work pretty much as normal (if there is a normal now) while her kids have been doing school work and then dips in and out to spend time with them when they need it (we were on a call yesterday when she was baking banana bread with them!).  Sun in our team is in Madrid and has a four-year-old and a baby so that’s much harder for her, but she’s been sharing childminding with her Husband and doing some work when the kids go to bed (no pressure from us but she says it’s keeping her sain!)  Ultimately it’s going to be a very individual thing that managers will need to discuss with each parent to come to the right arrangement for their circumstances and ideally, so they keep their job and aren’t worse off financially.  I think those of us without small children can appreciate how hard it is on them and are happy to pick up extra work to get through this and save our teammates!

    #5642
    Anonymous

    I’ve been reading through this thread with interest and just wanted to share my thoughts and experiences from the last few weeks.
    The uniqueness of the situation we have just now in terms of working from home (wfh) is that we’re ALL at home, excepting of course, our valued key workers and front line staff. That is making the wfh environment an entirely different one to the one we’re generally accustomed to. This has been eluded to by others who have commented and in various different guises. My wife and I are at home with 3 school aged children and a dog and it’s difficult not to have the ‘work’ at the very top of the priorities Mon-Fri, 9-5 (or it is for me!). But I’ve had to step back and consider how challenging it must be for my kids and wee Cavalier King Charles to creep about like mice when Mum and Dad work and take calls. I’ve quickly realised that we genuinely are all in this together; families, employers, key workers etc and that the pressures during this time affect all of us all in different ways. It’s taking a lot of adaptation for sure. If like me, you’re accustomed to ‘working hours’ and enjoy the interaction with others, it helps I think to reconsider how you spread out your day and allow the loved ones around you the freedom they deserve too and particularly in what I feel is like a pressure cooker at times. Take care everyone and keep healthy.

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